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20110709
20110709
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
're still sleeping. how can i get it done. i should have brought a big bag or something like that. any way i just put his head - and then then stash him in my kimono. i can't get in front of them. easy. this is a big hour. my next victim. [snickering quietly] next. bet i capture 150. my body is full of many herring. [laughing] where is my robe. it's missing. a temple god must have taken my ladder away. the man started pacing back and forth wondering how to get down. so, the sunlight made one of the birds wake up. bird:i can't breathe. so i must be catching a bad cold. i drank too much, saki rice wine last night. was a little tipsy. i don't remember. any way. think can't move. someone is leaning on me so who is it. my cousin. my brother. we've been got by a hunter. hey! my cousin, wake up. no. not a good morning. we've been caught by a hunter. pass the word but be quiet okay. okay. wake up, wake up, wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. hey! did you wake up? we've been caught by a hunter. right. i got a good plan. just do what i say. at the count of three, you flap y
. chained the back of the truck. watching the road behind him as he goes. this poem is called big thicket. jasper, texas. >> to big thicket a crack is a buck shot, a stick broke, cracked headlights. crack, the big thicket we go 2 sticks. drink, drink, light, light. stagger in the road. statistic o statistic broke. the light, buck shot light. >> buck on stagger. what you looking at. the white stick. along the trees, along the trees. the buck staggering home. the crack. big thicket. what are you doing here? >> stick broke. white light. break for home. white homing. ha, ha, go, go, buck shot, kra e crack, crack, crack. hit lights. what you think you are. >> ha, ha, stick broke. in the brushes. in the rushes. put them back on. bufks head in the rushes. put them back on. to big thicket we go, hot we go to hit staggeringly along the frees. crack, a steak broke. we go, go, go, buck shot. we go, go, go. up the road. road kill. staggering bucks. head light rushes. pick up brushes. race broke, screeching. the big thicket we go, buck shot, crack. the road kills. crack e a broke stick. on we go o
wrecking houses. there were building two a day -- they were building two with a. the 1930's were the big boom times for the sunset. >> this is a recession. >> these are the homes in west would park. -- in westwood park. >> how did this perform? the composite the assembly -- come's assembly -- composite assembly. >> they would stucco it. they would put chicken wire on it. >> when i inspect buildings that are being remodeled, i see that the chicken wire mesh is completely gone. >> it is galvanized. the saltwater was enough to rest it out. >> it people think stucco is waterproof -- it is not waterproof. it sucks the water in. you have to water protect it and paint it. >> the above the low medium that was going on -- the bungalow frenzy that was going on, people were building houses at a remarkable rate in the 1930's. nothing down. you can pay us later. we have to sell this. this is shared in school and the ocean view that it -- this is shariton school and the ocean view dedication. these early neighborhoods, this is 1910, they would have to do a lot of things themselves. the first school wa
to make their own instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is
. >> there ago. maybe there are more. >> we have a big article on race tracks on our website. outsidelands.org. >> the ingleside, you can still see that. >> they developed where that race track was, just south of ocean avenue, they kept the oval of the race track and created urbano drive. >> i think we have some progress of that. >> that is the inner sunset. that is where >> lawrence lives > i do. >> you can see the inner sandbank. it is a big old sand hill. they had to do a lot of grading. >> in the building department, when we go out and look to people to building development, as soon as they squared away the top 6 inches or whatever is there, it is all sand. forever. in my yard, and there is nothing you can do about it. it is what there is. it was generally developed in response to the 1890's for mid- winter there, which was held in golden gate park. would the first buildings that was built in that area was a bar called the little shamrock, and it is still there just west of lincoln, just west from ninth avenue. it was built to help service people who were working on the big winter fair
against those in your district. >> we definitely have a few big projects for issues -- or issues we're paying a lot of attention to and we will continue to devote a lot of attention to, both myself and my staff. one of biggest ones is the planned development of the new campus for california and pacific medical center. that has dominated a lot of city-wide dialogue in the past few years. that project is slated to go forward or get through the entitlement process this year in city hall. if you are not familiar, we currently have a california campus and a pacific campus, and the plan is to build a bigger campus and consolidate those services into one larger hospital at the old cathedral hill spa on van ness, and that is going to have a huge impact, both in terms of the neighborhood in district 2, not only the new campus, but what happens to the pacific and california campus. also, is a huge job creator. we're making sure to do it in a way to we have every constituent buy into the project, create a ton of new jobs, and move forward with a health care system that benefits all of us. othe
it at scale, and that has been the big challenge. >> can you elaborate on that? what does that mean exactly? >> we would not exist if there was not a feeling that a lot of these communities do not have the experience online of finding the information that is most relevant to them. there are a lot of great weekly newspapers. there are a lot of bulletin boards, facebook woods, you name it. there is a lot of media focused at local, but not every community has it, and even the ones that do often are not getting the kind of service that i think they used to historical because of downsizing and regional newspapers not serving those communities the way they used to. so you will have the council meeting not really being covered. we have had numerous examples where board meetings, council meetings, things that those members got used to not being covered. suddenly, they were seeing the week after week and seeing that we were there to stay. >> in the audience, do you feel like you're communities are being covered well? do you know what is going on in your back yard? do you feel like your stories being
to eat these big ice creams in cuba, used lots of cream. most dominica patrons were male but a few foreign women venturing to the famous establishment in the company of men from the court. one of these women was my grandmother, merced moynihan. in la dominica, one of the best cafes in the world, located on oreilly street, where my grandparents met. ticket to ride, i talk about my family history but after they marry -- i am reading a little from the book -- my grandparents were at the center of many fascinating things. i found myself at el centro, the literary and musical gatherings. their house on calle mercades became a cultural cross roads with the traffic of foreigners created a new inspired geography. they travel everywhere. my grandmother, merced, nina played the piano and read poems, while edward read the poems besides playing the fiddle and violin, behaved like an avant garde composer, moving around furniture. according to the journalist were a dynamic duo that rescued the famous hotel sevilla from dereliction in 1919. they also constructed the biltmore neighborhood where ma
this decision was so appropriate. >> the other big shock is that the moderates seem to have won this round. people thought, progressives have themselves on the board. there is no reason that they will not get together and take a noted leader who is a progressive to be interim mayor, and then stayed there for another term. the great thing about being in term mayor is to get to run as an incumbent. the fact that the progressives could not get together to get somebody into office as interim mayor in their own self-interest was very surprising for a lot of us. >> what happened in the last month in city hall was an incredible show of democracy that was part policy, part politics, and it all came together, and more than anything -- not just from a reporter's perspective, often was this? but there was a public interest as well on what was going on in san francisco government. we take it for granted a law that there is a city government here. this was something that brought people together. you heard people talking about it at the cafes, park playground, people who do not always pay attention. in
for one small site to exist, right? our strategy in the old days was to align ourselves with a big media company -- cbs. we align ourselves with yahoo! in some way and with ail -- aol in another way. you need the types of connections with more established or at least larger players in order to survive. the other reason is that the proliferation of sites has caused a change in the way people get their news. no longer do they just go to what we call destination sites, which was essentially a newspaper online. they are getting their news on facebook and google and bing and search engines. to be out there in that news sphere, you have to have different ways of attacking a and having connections and distribution arrangements. >> i would like to add that proliferation of new sites creates more demand for content, which creates more opportunity for professional writers. before you think about going into news as a business as an independent publisher, you have to think about what the need is, if there is a need in that particular space for another site, and then how you distinguish yourself and
. [applause] [horns honking] announcer: big dreams and good grades aren't enough to get into college. there are actual steps you need to take. finding someone who can help is the first and most important. for the next steps, go to knowhow2go.org. [music] ♪[applause] thank you. >> thank you for applauding. never know. [laughter]. so, these next few pieces are jewish art songs the jewish art song is not something that most people know about even if you are into classical music. raise your hand if you know shoemoner shoebert? these songs are actually in yiddish but they are art songs. they are beautiful. and they are not done. right. soy, i hope you enjoy the next few pieces. i will describe them. the first was written by [inaudible] a song that has almost nonsentence words but it's your time to be with god and your moment alone with whatever you need. i hope you appreciate this one. [music] ♪[applause] >> thank you. so the next piece, it's beautiful. this is yiddish a beautiful song that was given to me by george rosenside who is an amazing person. and this next piece was the sam
where there's a big boulder jammed into the bottom. every place has this backward trail, this labyrinth, leading you around. i was walking arpd this maze for about an hour before coming here and it does the same kind of thing where your mind settles, where you have to pay attention to where you are going. because if you look up for too long at all the passing architecture, you will forget where you are on the maze. you will end up in the wrong spot. you will end up going the wrong direction and you won't be able to find your way to the center. of course, out in the desert, you can't just walk off of the maze and out the front door and back into the street. out in the desert, you are there. the cliffs stand around you. the mazes are everywhere, passages opening up left and right. to write this book, house of rain, i walked a little bit over a thousand miles in legs from the four corners region from arizona, new mexico, colorado and california meet down to the chijuajua area of new mexico. there was one excavation along the way i remember out in the desert nears winslow, arizona. the dese
of mine asked if there would be a parade this year. there is going to be a parade every year. how big an organized it will be is a credit to many people who came together this year as never before. they were led by the next persons to address you. [applause] >> thank you. my name is lisa williams and i am the chairman of the pride board. i am pleased to be here. [applause] i am very pleased to be here to celebrate pride 2011. there were some challenges. folks like you step up. the board of directors stepped up. our staff stepped up. we're here today to pick up our celebration. i would also like to thank joa quin, paul, neighborhood services, the mayor's office and staff for supporting us from the beginning to the end. i also want to thank treasurer cisneros, supervisors campos, wiener, and all the others who called and asked what they could do for us. san francisco pride has had a strong relationship with the city. i also want to recognize former supervisor dufty who has been with us in the past and is currently with us now. [applause] i would like to express my gratitude to our fell
, the small ball moved the big ball, and this event and the later on coming efforts paved the way to the rapid development of china-u.s. relationship, and changed the world completely. after decades of concerted efforts, the relation between china and america has developed into one of the most important dynamic and promising bilateral relations in the world, which benefits tremendously not only our two nations, the world as a whole. to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the ping-pong diplomacy, there will be several events in the coming days. i think myself that these events are magnificent. they will help people, especially our young regeneration, know more about the history of the development of china-u.s. relations. they will help us review the achievements we have made over the past 40 years. and encourage us to do a better job in the future. this event will also reaffirmed the key role which people to people exchange place -- plays in the promotion of mutual friendship and understanding and trust. i am very happy to see that both our leaders in our two countries give prominent place to exc
. i was not in business until 1961. he made a big deal out of working in clay. the things he was doing was something never seen before. >> it is a large scale bronze. it has been sitting here of the hall of justice since 1971. talk about what happens to the work of art out of the elements. >> the arts commission commissioned the piece. they did not set aside money for repair. it has slowly changed color. it was black. it has been restored. >> it has been restored to the original patina. >> there was no damage done to its. i do not think there were any holes made in it. they have been working on it for six or eight weeks. it is practically ready to go. i am very excited to see it done. >> over the course of the arts in richmond program, we have added almost 800 works of art into the public space. maintaining that is not something that the bond funds allow us to do. this is why you came up with the idea of art care. >> i hope we get the community going and get people who really like to be involved. we will give them a chance to be involved. if you are interested in art, this is a marvelo
that carried the heavy downtown interest or big business. you had a lot of candidates on an even keel. what i felt quickly was the strategy to being successful was to build coalitions, and also to approach your communication in a multi land will approach. in my district, it is one of the most ethnically diverse parts of san francisco. we incorporated that. my campaign team was diverse. i had seniors. i had young people. i had different types of volunteers. i had folks that could speak chinese, spanish, someoan, all reaching out to bring people in. there is a certain level of malta and -- of momentum that help people. i would never ask my volunteers to do something i was not willing to do. we were at the bus stop at the morning handing out literature. i think that is critical, to bring into city hall that, yes, i am elected to lead, but more importantly to serve. that is my number one focus point. i am here to serve. when you call me, i am at 4 service. >> what about issues facing san francisco, facing your district, and how you are going to balance the needs of san francisco at large against
it is at a total capacity for what dpw can do. after three years, we do not want to come back with another big bond. what we would like to try to do is get the street repaving back to the general fund. build up the general fund so that it can cover the streets. it may at the 100%, so we are looking at taking back the vehicle license fee that the state now has. they use it for everything but our streets. we need to take that local decision and get our vehicle license fee back to our streets. the combination of those two will colon -- continue to allow us to have a good pot of money to continue maintaining the streets at a high level. but these three years will only keep us at the current level. it will not get us into a better place because of all of the backlog of streets in disrepair. i want to make sure that we have done enough so that it does not increase fivefold, if we did not do anything. that is the danger. i am spending my saturday -- weekends -- talking to neighborhood groups about pension reform, the street repaving bond. those are two important things we are doing. we will also be introd
the delegation was coming, asked for his help, and what a big help he has been. we also found out that he plays a big pingpong himself, so we look forward to seeing that. mayor lee, the show is all yours. [applause] mayor lee: thank you, everyone. welcome to city hall, and welcome to our celebration of the 40th anniversary of ping- pong diplomacy. i also want to welcome supervisor eric mar. thank you for being here. i know he has a wealth of chinese residents and residents in the whole district that want to play ping-pong this year. i want to welcome everyone here. our counsel general in china, the head of the table tennis association in china. thank you very much for being here. the wonderful guest from our bay area sports organizing committee and the united states table tennis association. thank you for being here as well. 40 years ago, i was studying really hard in college. i was actually studying about china and wondering where my parents came from and what they were doing in those years and what caused them to come to america and give birth to six kids and start us on our journeys in our o
. this was a big deal getting married. we have talked to people together for 38, 40 years. they are excited and nervous. >> once we figured a way to have a security area for appointments for license and ceremony. we looked at the north light court how it's structured. how people would come in and the work flow of that area. there is a check-in area in front of the central entrance and they would verify their appointments and they would proceed. >> my wife who works for the city told me they were looking for volunteers. and that's me. so, i was interested in helping out. and i think it's those people that have been together for a long time that are the most moving story. i am sure the young people appreciate, the more you appreciate the change. >> i think what's also moving is the fact that everyone that works in the city is enthusiastic. everybody in city hall. they are very excited and behind the whole change going into affect. >> i just got an email. i work for the san francisco public library. they needed volunteers. it was something i wanted to do. i have friends who have been married.
think the business model in the media always changes. the big one that everyone has seen in their lifetime is, when i was a kid, tv was free. across america, it was funded by advertisers. today, the vast majority of americans pay a fee to get television. if the contact mix is right, hard journalism, entertainment, people will pay. all along the spectrum from the complete the paid to be completely ad-funded, you see it all today. one of the crisis we have now is the old model of classified advertising, paying for hard news journalism on paper has broken the, and is being replaced. that business model change had been a constant for 150 years. there are millions of models that work, and will be, and capital can chase them, as you get a 10x return, as you described. >> we want to get to everyone's questions. >> my name is alex. i have heard two major themes about new media. one, that it has a radical democratic potential, low barrier to entry, but i have also heard repeated again and again, in order for your model to be successful, in order for your web site to be successful,
youth-oriented. i think you could have a big input to make sure that what we are doing will be there for you to raise families as well. i want to congratulate all the nominees tonight. all of you who have been participating in this competition for the fellowship have been doing great work. i have been reading through some of the accomplishments that you are a part of. i got to meet some of you, luckily, last month when you participated in youth advocacy day, but you also followed up -- some of you were at the old school cafe with what house representatives about what the youths were looking at in terms of their future, participation in the city. here in city hall, we are serious about having programs that not only help you out, but to make sure you get the support you need to be successful. we want you and need you to be successful. without that, we are literally a soulless city. whether it is being able to traverse on a good muni system, having a good education system, or being able to work in a company like twitter. i am working with two great supervisors and we are w
that san francisco is not a big business-friendly city. i think we started to go in the wrong direction. the reason why we started walking down that path largely was because of political ideology. when you deal with me, you are dealing with facts, less than politics. i really want to have a positive impact on the city overall. >> good afternoon, everyone. how are you? >> good. >> it's a nice day today. thank you for coming out to our community event. please give a round of [applause] to them. we have a lot of development going on. you see how lovely leland street looks. do you like it? >> yes. >> beautiful, isn't it? we are going to continue. we have a library that is going to be opening up in june. that's right. so i will see you all there at the library. there is a lot of activity going on. it is important we remain connected and engaged. >> would you mind if we were to pull the seniors together and translate for me in a mini meeting? >> yes, sir. >> what we are going ready to do is we are going to have a quick little mini meeting to -- because we didn't translate my short message bef
it was something that was a big concern and worry for my family at the time. i remember thinking even at that age how important it was to consider what the economics were in communities, whether people had or felt that they had opportunities or did not have opportunities, and what role it was that government played in those outcomes. >> [inaudible] supervisor chu: that is what really put me on the path to public policy. so i pursued public policy both at occidental college where i went to school as an undergrad, and also uc berkeley where i pursued public policy. i work on public finance for a while after i graduated and came back to government to really pursue that. ever since then, i have stayed here and fallen in love with how wonderful the bay area is. it is a really great place to be. all around the room, you will see a lot of great financial institutions. talk to them. you will see people who can help you with financial aid. talk to them. he will see departments that might have summer job opportunities. talk to them. utilize your opportunities today. learn a little bit about what you should
. that flexibility is called the flow -- float in our charter, and that is a big distinction with the alternative proposal that is still being marketed by mr. adachi. it is important for you to know that. that distinction called vested rights. many cities across the country -- when they have not considered the employees' pension has a vested right, they get into legal trouble very quickly. that is why
to perform it in new york for october for a big jewish audience and people fell in love with it. it's a true story and something that still exists now. this means god watches over -- this piece a girlfriend her boyfriend goes to war and she says, i was lucking to be in love for a little while. i had love and everything i could ever want and now he's off at war and i'm alone. and i don't know what will happen after this. will he kill another mother's child. will i have to live with that? god watch over my belove ed and all the mother's sons. [music] [applause] >> so, not sure how much time we have left? keep going. all right. right? all right. so the next few pieces i wanted to tell you about. one is by [inaudible] and the other is by the same composer that did [inaudible] those conductors the father of russian music. know this song is not a song that was a yiddish it was a russian song and translated to yiddish because people loved it so much when they immigrated to new york it became a favorite. this next piece the lark, is a beautiful piece about a small bird singing between the skies and
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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